View What is meant by unstructured data?

What is meant by unstructured data?

Unstructured data is the term used to denote all data that does not sit in rows and columns databases, that is, it is not part of a SQL or Oracle type database. Examples include all types of office documents, as well as emails, scanned images, PDFs, video, CCTV/digital camera footage and even data from internet…

read more


View Where do we find unstructured data?

Where do we find unstructured data?

Unstructured data is found in personal drives, shared drives, departmental drives, email systems, document and record management systems, cloud storage and anywhere that data can be found. Moreover, the same data and information can be found in multiple locations as people store duplicate copies and versions locally, personally or in enterprise repositories. Many organisations think…

read more


View How do we understand unstructured data?

How do we understand unstructured data?

Understanding unstructured data requires a data discovery exercise. Organisations must first ask themselves “What information have we got and where is it?” in order to understand where their information repositories are located and to gain a high-level understanding of the information contained within each, which may often be very approximate. The step requires obtaining an…

read more


View Is unstructured data necessarily a problem?

Is unstructured data necessarily a problem?

Unstructured data is a problem wherever there is a requirement for any form of information production. The process of information production refers to creating a set of documents, data or information for litigation, for regulators, for compliance, for internal or external audit, or indeed for anyone who needs to see a set of information satisfying…

read more


View Why is unstructured data considered risky?

Why is unstructured data considered risky?

The big issue is uncertainty: we don’t know what is in there. Most content sitting in structured databases started life as unstructured, as a result of conversation/phone call/email/forms. This original unstructured data is still sitting there – somewhere – potentially discoverable and evidential. It may contain sensitive personal data, e.g. relating to medical records/religious beliefs/finances/children….

read more


View How should I classify unstructured data?

How should I classify unstructured data?

The best way to understand unstructured data is to classify it in some way. Classification of data can be automatic at a high level but, for more granular classification there is a need to engage with the business to understand the requirements of the organisation. A combination of good technical capability allied to the right…

read more


View How can I search my unstructured data?

How can I search my unstructured data?

Tools like Windows search, or Outlook search will allow you to search within or across unstructured data sets. (Outlook has better search tool than you might expect, offering the ability to perform metadata and content searches across both documents and attachments). The problem with many search tools is that they have limited use as one-off…

read more